Tuesday, April 6, 2010

White Wednesday Time

It's White Wednesday time here at Applejack Lane.  With the temperatures reaching 90 degrees today, thoughts of getting the outside set for summer entered the picture.  I pulled out an old twig table reportedly made by my grandmother.  My dad was lucky enough to claim it, and years later, so was I.
Now the question-to paint or not paint?
Hopefully,  next week I'll add a few Springy things.
Thanks to Kathleen of Faded Charm Cottage for hosting this blog party.

16 comments:

Allie and Pattie said...

I rather love it as it is- so pretty!
xoxo Pattie

Allison Shops said...

How nice to own your grandmother's handywork. I would leave it as is.

Be sure to enter our Giveway at AtticMag!

Sherry said...

Beautiful treasure of a table! How nice you have it.

Cindy Geilmann said...

Oh my goodness, leave it the way it is. It's hard for me to imagine 90 degrees. When we left our house, in South Jordan Utah it was 35 degrees and we are in St George Utah now and it is 64 degrees.

come visit
cindy@stitches

Paula said...

Your grandmother made that?? Wow! I like it as is and definitely wouldn't paint it.

Rosewood Cottage said...

what a beautiful treasure you have! I can't imagine hitting 90 in April! stay cool! :)

Mary Beth @ Live. Laugh. Make Something said...

absolutely delightful! so charming with great memories! Leave that baby the way it is! Hope to see you back at my place. until later...

A Cottage Muse said...

I think it looks perfect just as it is! Glad I stopped by!

Vintage Amethyst said...

Oh how lovely, I think it looks pretty just the way it is.
Hope you will pop along & visit my White Wednesday post.
love
Alison
x

Boo-Bah said...

It is lovely just as it is.

Just a dreamer said...

DO NOT, I repeat, DO NOT paint it. Jackie

The White Farmhouse said...

I vote for leave it as it is! Love it and all it's chippy beauty. It is quite an incredible table on it's own.

Thanks for stopping by! Love your blog. I can't wait to read through the older posts too.

Sherry @ No Minimalist Here said...

I also vote for leaving the table as it is. Thanks for your visit and leaving a comment on the Richmond Easter parade. Hubby and I spent some time in the Shenandoah valley last fall. What a beautiful place to live.

raggygirlvintage said...

Hi Joan,

Thanks for stopping by my blog today! I am so jealous, 90 degrees, it was in the 40s today, gray and wet....don't get me wrong, I love Vancouver and it can be so beautiful here, but just had enough of the rain this week!!

I say no paint, it is so nice and chippy, maybe give it a bit more time:-)

Take care,
Tracey

raggygirlvintage said...

Oh yes, I'm your follower too now!
Tracey

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